All posts by Melinda Olson

Eighth Western Native Plant Conference

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pre-Conference Field Tour hosted by the Center for Natural Lands Management, South Puget Sound Program (optional event on registration form)

Transportation and lunch included
Field tour weather could be cool and rainy; participants should bring sturdy, waterproof walking shoes and clothing suitable for cold, wet, or muddy conditions.

8:30   Board buses at The Hotel RL
5:00   Arrive back at The Hotel RL

The field tour will consist of several stops including: Violet Prairie Scatter Creek Preserve (agriculture conversion project); Violet Prairie native seed farm; Mima Mounds Natural Area Preserve; Shotwell’s Landing Nursery (seed cleaning, greenhouses, and seed beds); and Glacial Heritage (1,000-acre restored prairie).

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

8:30   Registration and Continental Breakfast
9:00   Welcome and IntroductionsDiane Haase, Western Nursery Specialist, USDA Forest Service, Portland, OR
9:10   Growing Wild Plants: Philosophy and PracticeNed McGinely, Sound Native Plants, Olympia, WA
9:45   Climate Influences Range and Phenology of Northwest Shrub SpeciesConnie Harrington, USDA Forest Service, Olympia, WA
10:20   Break
10:50   Long-Term Management Impacts on Plant Communities in Upland Prairies in the Willamette ValleyMatt Bahm, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR
11:25   If You Build It, Will They Come? The Effects of Plant Restoration on Pollinator Diversity in Willamette Valley/Puget Trough PrairiesSusan Waters, Center for Natural Lands Management, Olympia, WA
12:00   Lunch (included with registration)
1:15   Seed Propagation Using an Oxygenated Water BathDerek Tilley, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Aberdeen, ID
1:50   Outcomes of Post-Fire Seeding Experiments Using Native Seed Mixes in the Great BasinJeff Ott, USDA Forest Service, Boise, ID
2:25   Expanding the Conservation Portfolio: Reintroducing Native Plants to Working Lands in Western WashingtonSarah Hamman, Center for Natural Lands Management, Olympia, WA
3:00   Break
3:30   Native Plant Curriculum for Middle and High School StudentsTyler Knapp, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR
4:05   Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Seed Technology for Direct Seeding In Forests and RangelandsTiffani Manteuffel-Ross, DroneSeed, Seattle, WA
4:40 Adjourn

Thursday, November 14, 2019

8:00 Continental Breakfast
8:15   What’s Luck Got to Do with It? Rollin’ on the Restoration RiverLee Riley, USDA Forest Service, Cottage Grove, OR
8:50   Role of the Plot-Sized Farmer in Native Seed ProductionSierra Smith, Center for Natural Lands Management, Olympia, WA
9:25   Establishing Habitat for Honeybee Health and ConservationAshley Baird, Beecoming Project, Portland, OR
10:00   Break
10:30   Determining the Scale of Local Adaptation: What Can We Learn From A Large-Scale Reciprocal Transplant Study of an Important Restoration Grass Species?Francis Kilkenny, USDA Forest Service, Boise, ID
11:05   ‘Restoring’ for Future Climates: Plant Population Dynamics Across a Latitudinal Gradient in a Climate Manipulation ExperimentPaul Reed, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
11:40   Combining Nitrogen and Rhizobia to Improve Nursery Growth of Nitrogen-Fixing PlantsKas Dumroese, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, ID
12:15   Lunch (included with registration)
1:30   Teaching, Growing, Restoring: Developing Vocational Curricula for Adults in Custody Involved in Sagebrush ProductionDionné Mejia, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR
2:05   Grasses as Invasive SpeciesClay Antieau, City of Seattle
2:40   Adjourn

3rd Annual Pacific Northwest Forest Vegetation Management Conference

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

8:15   Opening Remarks
8:30   Personal Protective Equipment for Dermal Protection in ForestryCarol Black, Washington State University
9:45   Break
10:15   Sustaining Site Productivity: Lessons Learned From 25 years of the North American Long-Term Soil Productivity ExperimentDebbie Dumroese, USDA Forest Service
10:45   Everything You Have Always Wanted to Know About Using Mastication for Site PrepTerrie Jain, USDA Forest Service
11:15   The State of Fear and How it Affects your Ability to Grow TreesHeather Hansen, WA Friends of Farm and Forests
12:00   Lunch
1:00   Suppliers update
1:30 One Landowner is Thinning While the Adjoining Landowner is not: Which One is Losing Money?Greg Latta, University of Idaho
2:00  Does a Liability Jury Decision Change the Toxicology of Roundup?Alan Felsot, Washington State University
3:00   Break
3:15   Red Alder Growth ModelAndrew Bluhm, Hardwood Silvicultural Coop., Oregon State University
3:45   Herbicide Applications in Lincoln County, OR With an Aerial Spray BanJoe Steere & Luke Bergey, Miami Corp
4:15   Managing Troublesome Weeds North of the 45th ParallelBranden Sirguy, Merrill & Ring
4:45   Political Issues in OregonKatie Fast, Oregonians for Food and Shelter
5:15   Reception

Thursday, December 5, 2019

8:00   Speaker TBA
9:00   Forest Vegetation Management Mixes Without Glyphosate in the Inland EmpireJoel Fields, Wilbur-Ellis
9:30   Forest Vegetation Management Mixes Without Glyphosate in the West Side of the CascadesEric Hippler, Wilbur-Ellis
10:00   Break
10:30   Beyond Aerial Applications: Alternative Herbicide Application MethodsBonnie Covell, Weyerhaeuser
11:00   Beyond Averages: Transforming Your Regeneration Plots into Useful InformationBruce Ripley, Hancock Forest Management
12:00   Lunch
1:00   Noxious and Invasive Weeds: Identifying and ReportingWyatt Williams, OR Dept of Forestry
2:00   Results of a PNW Reforestation Cost SurveyDan Opalach, Forest Biometrics Research Institute
2:45   Break
3:00   Labels, Handling, and PPE Use Rule UpdatesGrant Jackson, OR Dept. of Agriculture
4:00   Adjourn

Mapping The Course: Timberland, Forest Products Processing, And Fiber Issues For 2020

7:00   Networking buffet style breakfast

8:30   Opportunities and Stressors for the North American Forest Industry in 2020Hamir Patel, CIBC World Markets

9:00   Outlook for Sawlog and Pulpwood Prices in Western US and Western CanadaHakan Ekstrom, Wood Resources International

9:30   Federal Forest Lands Issues in 2020Tom Schultz, Idaho Forest Group

10:00   Break

10:30   Strategic Issues for US PNW Timberlands in 2020Speaker TBA

11:00   US PNW Sawmill SectorSteve Courtney, Roseburg Forest Products Co.

11:30   US PNW Pulp Mill SectorJeff Walton, Cascade Pacific

12:00   Lunch

1:00   BC Interior Log Supply IssuesBrad Bennett, Interfor

1:30   BC Coastal Log Supply IssuesAlbert Nussbaum, Forest Analysis and Inventory Department, BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural, Resource Operations

2:00   Biomass Availability in 2020Greg Frohn, Avista

2:30   Break

3:00   BC, PNW and Idaho Transportation IssuesDale Lemmons, Signature Transport

3:30   Why and Where to Invest in Timberlands in North America – A Focus on the US NorthwestBrooks Mendell, Forisk Consulting

2018 PNW Reforestation Council Annual Meeting

Click on the presentation title below to view a PDF of the presentation.

8:30Nursery Crop Visits: What to Look for and the Questions to Ask Your GrowerAbbie Acuff, PotlatchDeltic, Lewiston, ID

9:30Forest Restoration: An Ecophysiological, or Seedling’s PerspectiveSteve Grossnickle, NurseryToForest Solutions, Saanich, BC

An understanding of the ecophysiological capability of the planted forest species in combination with desirable seedling quality attributes and proper silvicultural practices can ensure that planted seedlings have the best chance at rapid plantation establishment.

10:30  Break

11:00Operational Research HighlightsTim Harrington, PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Olympia, WA

  1. 20 yrs. of thinning and fertilization on droughty sites.
  2. Preventing the development of recalcitrant plant communities.
  3. Methods for controlling Scotch Broom.
  4. Conifer regeneration performance versus opening size.
  5. Comparing stand growth with silvicultural systems.

Noon  Lunch (included with registration)

1:00Broadcast Burning in Western Oregon: Operational and Cost ConsiderationsDave Cramsey, Roseburg, Veneta, OR and Brian Schrag, Roseburg, North Bend, OR

1:45H-2B visas and Business Risk ManagementBrad Maier, Schwabe, Willamson and Wyatt, Portland, OR

2:45  Break

3:00Responding to and Managing Environmental IncidentsElizabeth Howard, Schwabe, Williamson and Wyatt, Portland, OR

3:45Moving Drones into Operational ForestryJake Thiemens, Hancock Forest Management, Independence, OR and Grant Canary, DroneSeed, Seattle, WA

  1. Securing the right permits/licenses.
  2. Finding the right equipment.
  3. Drone planting with pelleted seed.
  4. Drone ferrying of seedlings during operations.
  5. Broadcast and spot spray herbicide applications with drones.
  6. Using drone sensors for targeting herbicide applications and identifying moisture stress and fertilizer needs.
  7. Labor/cost analysis?

4:15  Adjourn

Westside Forest Health Issues: Identification and Management

8:30Steps of Diagnosis for Insect and Disease ProblemsBeth Willhite, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Westside Insect and Disease Service Center, Sandy, OR

9:00Black Stain Root DiseaseSarah Navarro, Oregon Department of Forestry, Salem, OR

9:30Armillaria Root Disease/ Laminated Root RotKristen Chadwick, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Westside Insect and Disease Service Center, Sandy, OR

10:00   Break

10:25Swiss Needle Cast: An Epic Tale of Complex Interactions Between Climate, Trees and a PathogenDave Shaw, Extension Forest Health, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

11:00Douglas-Fir BeetleGlenn Kohler, Washington Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

11:30Managing for White Pine Blister Rust: Bringing Western White Pine into Westside SilvicultureHolly Kearns, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Westside Insect and Disease Service Center, Sandy, OR

12:00   Lunch

1:00Identifying Diseases on SeedlingsAnna Leon, Weyerhaeuser, Centralia, WA

1:30Drought Impacts on Forest Health and Flatheaded Wood Borer ManagementBill Schaupp, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Southwest Oregon Service Center, Central Point, OR (invited)

2:15Bark Beetles and Wood Borers in Drought-Stressed Douglas-FirGlenn Kohler, Washington Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

2:45   Break

3:00Sudden Oak DeathSarah Navarro, Oregon Department of Forestry, Salem, OR

3:30Invasive Forest Insect and Disease Threats to Oregon and WashingtonWyatt Williams, Oregon Department of Forestry, Salem, OR

4:00   Adjourn

Eastside Seedling Characteristics and Quality for Optimum Field Performance

Joint annual meeting of the Western Forestry and Conservation Nursery Association and the Intermountain Container Seedling Growers’ Association

Thursday, October 25

  • 8:30   Welcome and Introductions
  • 8:40The Role of Nurseries to Meet Dry Forest Restoration NeedsOwen Burney, New Mexico State University, Mora, NM
  • 9:15Rapid Root Growth Potential Testing of Inland Conifer Species with Aeroponic Mist ChambersAndrew Nelson, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
  • 9:50Seed Increase and Harvest for Native Forbs and GrassesNathan Robertson, USDA Forest Service, Coeur d’Alene Nursery, ID
  • 10:25   Break
  • 10:50Optimizing Successful 5-Needle Pine Reforestation: Genetic Considerations in Sowing, Growing and Deploying Blister Rust Resistant SeedlingsMary Frances Mahalovich, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, ID
  • 11:25Challenges and Opportunities for Maintaining Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Southwestern U.S.Tom Kolb, University of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ
  • 12:00   Lunch (included with registration)
  • 1:00   Field Tour – Coeur d’Alene Nursery (transportation provided)
    The USDA Forest Service’s Coeur d’Alene Nursery was established in 1960 on 222 acres. The nursery’s mission is to provide quality seedlings for publicly owned lands and to develop the best possible methods for producing quality seedlings. To fulfill this mission, the nursery maintains 130 acres of seedbeds and 17 greenhouses. The nursery also cleans, tests, and stores seed, and provides seedling quality testing. The nursery’s 28 permanent employees have a combined 500 years of nursery experience.
  • 5:30   Evening Event (included with registration)

Friday, October 26

  • 8:30Woods Evaluation of Container Red Alder Grown with Bonzi® Plant Growth RegulatorNabil Khadduri, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Webster Nursery, Olympia, WA
  • 9:05Reforestation in Harsh Sites in MexicoArnulfo Aldrete, Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo, Mexico
  • 9:40Seedling Performance Metrics: A Standardized Monitoring ApproachAbbie Acuff, PotlatchDeltic, Lewiston, ID
  • 10:15   Break
  • 10:50What Do You Do After The End of the World? A Climate Adaptation Case Study from Northern New MexicoCollin Haffey, The Nature Conservancy, Santa Fe, NM
  • 11:25   Monitoring Plant Stress from Multiple Levels — Lloyd Nackley, Oregon State University, North Willamette Research and Extension Center, Aurora, OR
  • 12:00   Lunch (included with registration)
  • 1:00Stratification and Scarification Strategies for Whitebark Pine SeedEmily Rhoades, USDA Forest Service, Coeur d’Alene Nursery, ID
  • 1:35iFertigate and So Can You! Introducing a Mobile App for Calculating Fertigation FormulasDaniel Drummond, Southern Regional Extension Forestry, Athens, GA
  • 2:10Growing Container Seedlings in a Biochar-Amended SubstrateJeremy Pinto, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Moscow, ID
  • 2:45   Adjourn

What to do When You Meet Someone Suspicious in the Woods: Intervention and Contact Guidelines for Forestry Personnel

Workshop 1: What to do When You Meet Someone Suspicious in the Woods: Intervention and Contact Guidelines for Forestry Personnel

8:00 am to 12:00 pm, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

  • What are the basic factors for safe encounters in the woods? These actions will help keep you safe in uncertain situations: tactical plans, communication, proper tactics, physical condition and positive mental attitude.
  • What are the warning signs of a potential attack? Recognizing the signs of posture, verbal threats, disobeying instructions and positioning.
  • How should you respond to a potential attack? Avoid the mistakes of rushing when not required, relaxing too soon, not practicing, not utilizing cover and assuming a tough guy attitude.
  • What are the guidelines for maintaining your safety in attack situations? Follow the guidelines of not being afraid to be afraid, knowing your capabilities and knowing what the other person is capable of.
  • How do you assess a threat? What are the early signs of a potential attack? How can you analyze the threat? When to escalate your level of resistance. Avoiding over reaction and under reaction.
  • What to do if the situation arises to a physical confrontation and how to respond to danger.
  • Who do you call before, during and after? Maintaining communications with local law enforcement.
  • Dealing with dumping and squatting on your ownership.
Different workshop, same day, same location. Details below…

Workshop 2: Building Interpersonal and Group Communication Skills for Resolving Difficult Situations and Conflicts in Natural Resources

1:00 to 4 PM, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

Do you cringe at the idea of approaching a neighbor regarding shared expenses? Would you rather eat the costs instead of talking to a contractor about a service that did not meet expectations? Do you want to skip watershed or forest collaborative meetings when you know the topic will be heated? Why talk to people you disagree with in the first place?

As much as we would like to avoid uncomfortable conversations, it is often crucial for progress. Today more than ever it is important for us as foresters, members of organizations, or just citizens in our communities, to be able to engage in open and productive discussions over difficult or controversial issues. This class will help you develop practical skills, and give you some tools and processes that will help you and any organizations you participate in to work through difficult scenarios. Bring your real-life challenges, we will work on them!

Topics Covered will Include:

  1. Reframing Conflict as an Opportunity
  2. Understanding Conflict Styles
  3. Active Listening Principles and Skills
  4. Conflict in Group Settings
  5. Collaborative Leadership Skills
  6. Setting Meetings up for Success

Building Interpersonal and Group Communication Skills for Resolving Difficult Situations and Conflicts in Natural Resources

Workshop 2: Building Interpersonal and Group Communication Skills for Resolving Difficult Situations and Conflicts in Natural Resources

1:00 to 4 PM, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

Do you cringe at the idea of approaching a neighbor regarding shared expenses? Would you rather eat the costs instead of talking to a contractor about a service that did not meet expectations? Do you want to skip watershed or forest collaborative meetings when you know the topic will be heated? Why talk to people you disagree with in the first place?

As much as we would like to avoid uncomfortable conversations, it is often crucial for progress. Today more than ever it is important for us as foresters, members of organizations, or just citizens in our communities, to be able to engage in open and productive discussions over difficult or controversial issues. This class will help you develop practical skills, and give you some tools and processes that will help you and any organizations you participate in to work through difficult scenarios. Bring your real-life challenges, we will work on them!

Topics Covered will Include:

  1. Reframing Conflict as an Opportunity
  2. Understanding Conflict Styles
  3. Active Listening Principles and Skills
  4. Conflict in Group Settings
  5. Collaborative Leadership Skills
  6. Setting Meetings up for Success
Different workshop, same day, same location. Details below…

Workshop 1: What to do When You Meet Someone Suspicious in the Woods: Intervention and Contact Guidelines for Forestry Personnel

8:00 am to 12:00 pm, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

  • What are the basic factors for safe encounters in the woods? These actions will help keep you safe in uncertain situations: tactical plans, communication, proper tactics, physical condition and positive mental attitude.
  • What are the warning signs of a potential attack? Recognizing the signs of posture, verbal threats, disobeying instructions and positioning.
  • How should you respond to a potential attack? Avoid the mistakes of rushing when not required, relaxing too soon, not practicing, not utilizing cover and assuming a tough guy attitude.
  • What are the guidelines for maintaining your safety in attack situations? Follow the guidelines of not being afraid to be afraid, knowing your capabilities and knowing what the other person is capable of.
  • How do you assess a threat? What are the early signs of a potential attack? How can you analyze the threat? When to escalate your level of resistance. Avoiding over reaction and under reaction.
  • What to do if the situation arises to a physical confrontation and how to respond to danger.
  • Who do you call before, during and after? Maintaining communications with local law enforcement.
  • Dealing with dumping and squatting on your ownership.

Forest Road Surfacing: Basic Design Principles and Applied Practices

Thursday, November 8:

8:30  Introduction, Expectations, and Workshop Overview

9:00Common Road Surfacing Issues

  • The What, Where, and When Factors: Geology, Soils, Aggregate, Road Prism and Maintenance.
  • How They Make a Difference in Costs, Water Quality and Safety?

10:00  Break

10:30Soils Engineering – Relating Basic Properties to Road Surface Design
Subgrade

  • Soil Classification
  • Soil Moisture Content and Density

Noon  Lunch (included with registration)

1:00Soils Engineering – Relating Mechanical Properties to Road Surface Design

  • Potential Soil Strength vs. Actual Soil Strength
  • Geosynthetics
  • Subgrade Stabilization

2:30  Break

3:00How to Access Local Rock Sources

  • Geology Considerations
  • Rock Source Suitability
  • Rock Classification Methods
  • Aggregate Production and Development

5:00 Adjourn

Friday, November 9:

8:00Does the Rock Meet My Needs?

  • Gradation
  • Durability
  • Dust Abatement
  • Recycling Aggregate
  • Use of RAP

9:30   Break

10:00Commonly Used Aggregate Design Methods

  • AASHTO 1993 – Rut Equation
  • USDA Forest Service – STP
  • OR Dept. of Forestry Surfacing Guidance
  • Using What Has Worked in the Past

Noon   Lunch (included with registration)

1:00Surfacing Design Example Problems

  • Year-round Haul
  • Seasonal Haul
  • Restricted Haul

2:30   Break

3:00Road Surfacing BMPs and Sediment Reduction

  • Mechanics of Sediment Production from Forest Roads
  • Mitigating Surfacing Erosion
  • BMPs

4:00  Summary and Q&A

4:30  Adjourn

2018 PNW Forest Vegetation Management Conference: Vegetation Management in the Wildland Urban Interface


Click on the green presentation titles below to view a PDF of the presentation.

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Setting Stands up for Success – From Seed to PCT: Applied Early Stand Silviculture in the Inland Northwest

8:00Introduction and WelcomeMark Kimsey, Intermountain Forestry Cooperative, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

8:05Starting With the Best Seed: Genetic Testing and Seed Production To Improve Dry Side Disease Resistance and ValueJeff DeBell, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

8:30What’s New in Nursery Technology, Seedling Production, Seedling Failure, and Quality Assurance and ControlDiane Haase, Reforestation, Nurseries and Genetics Resources, USDA Forest Service, Portland, OR

8:55Developing Successful Operational Chemical Site Preparation PrescriptionsBill Pittman, Stimson Lumber Company, Coeur d’Alene, ID

9:20   Break

9:50The Importance of Seedling Quality for Successful Reforestation in the Inland NorthwestAndrew Nelson, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

10:20The Balance of Canopy Opening and Site Preparation to Successfully Regenerate Moist Mixed Conifer ForestsTerrie Jain, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, ID

10:45Panel: What Works and What Doesn’t at the Operational Level

  • Adam Robertson, PotlatchDeltic Corporation
  • Julie Donohoe, Idaho Dept. of Lands
  • Patrick Marolla, Hancock Forest Management
  • Scott McLeod, Washington Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

11:45   Lunch

1:00Site-species Effects on Maximum Stand Density IndexMark Kimsey, Intermountain Forestry Cooperative, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

1:30Economics of Pre-commercial ThinningGreg Latta, College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

2:00   Break

2:15Why and How we Conduct Early Stand Silviculture

3:00 – 3:30   Meeting wrap up – group discussion