All posts by Melinda Olson

2018 PNW Reforestation Council Annual Meeting

Click on the presentation title below to view a PDF of the presentation.

8:30Nursery Crop Visits: What to Look for and the Questions to Ask Your GrowerAbbie Acuff, PotlatchDeltic, Lewiston, ID

9:30Forest Restoration: An Ecophysiological, or Seedling’s PerspectiveSteve Grossnickle, NurseryToForest Solutions, Saanich, BC

An understanding of the ecophysiological capability of the planted forest species in combination with desirable seedling quality attributes and proper silvicultural practices can ensure that planted seedlings have the best chance at rapid plantation establishment.

10:30  Break

11:00Operational Research HighlightsTim Harrington, PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Olympia, WA

  1. 20 yrs. of thinning and fertilization on droughty sites.
  2. Preventing the development of recalcitrant plant communities.
  3. Methods for controlling Scotch Broom.
  4. Conifer regeneration performance versus opening size.
  5. Comparing stand growth with silvicultural systems.

Noon  Lunch (included with registration)

1:00Broadcast Burning in Western Oregon: Operational and Cost ConsiderationsDave Cramsey, Roseburg, Veneta, OR and Brian Schrag, Roseburg, North Bend, OR

1:45H-2B visas and Business Risk ManagementBrad Maier, Schwabe, Willamson and Wyatt, Portland, OR

2:45  Break

3:00Responding to and Managing Environmental IncidentsElizabeth Howard, Schwabe, Williamson and Wyatt, Portland, OR

3:45Moving Drones into Operational ForestryJake Thiemens, Hancock Forest Management, Independence, OR and Grant Canary, DroneSeed, Seattle, WA

  1. Securing the right permits/licenses.
  2. Finding the right equipment.
  3. Drone planting with pelleted seed.
  4. Drone ferrying of seedlings during operations.
  5. Broadcast and spot spray herbicide applications with drones.
  6. Using drone sensors for targeting herbicide applications and identifying moisture stress and fertilizer needs.
  7. Labor/cost analysis?

4:15  Adjourn

Westside Forest Health Issues: Identification and Management

8:30Steps of Diagnosis for Insect and Disease ProblemsBeth Willhite, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Westside Insect and Disease Service Center, Sandy, OR

9:00Black Stain Root DiseaseSarah Navarro, Oregon Department of Forestry, Salem, OR

9:30Armillaria Root Disease/ Laminated Root RotKristen Chadwick, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Westside Insect and Disease Service Center, Sandy, OR

10:00   Break

10:25Swiss Needle Cast: An Epic Tale of Complex Interactions Between Climate, Trees and a PathogenDave Shaw, Extension Forest Health, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

11:00Douglas-Fir BeetleGlenn Kohler, Washington Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

11:30Managing for White Pine Blister Rust: Bringing Western White Pine into Westside SilvicultureHolly Kearns, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Westside Insect and Disease Service Center, Sandy, OR

12:00   Lunch

1:00Identifying Diseases on SeedlingsAnna Leon, Weyerhaeuser, Centralia, WA

1:30Drought Impacts on Forest Health and Flatheaded Wood Borer ManagementBill Schaupp, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Southwest Oregon Service Center, Central Point, OR (invited)

2:15Bark Beetles and Wood Borers in Drought-Stressed Douglas-FirGlenn Kohler, Washington Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

2:45   Break

3:00Sudden Oak DeathSarah Navarro, Oregon Department of Forestry, Salem, OR

3:30Invasive Forest Insect and Disease Threats to Oregon and WashingtonWyatt Williams, Oregon Department of Forestry, Salem, OR

4:00   Adjourn

Eastside Seedling Characteristics and Quality for Optimum Field Performance

Joint annual meeting of the Western Forestry and Conservation Nursery Association and the Intermountain Container Seedling Growers’ Association

Thursday, October 25

  • 8:30   Welcome and Introductions
  • 8:40The Role of Nurseries to Meet Dry Forest Restoration NeedsOwen Burney, New Mexico State University, Mora, NM
  • 9:15Rapid Root Growth Potential Testing of Inland Conifer Species with Aeroponic Mist ChambersAndrew Nelson, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
  • 9:50Seed Increase and Harvest for Native Forbs and GrassesNathan Robertson, USDA Forest Service, Coeur d’Alene Nursery, ID
  • 10:25   Break
  • 10:50Optimizing Successful 5-Needle Pine Reforestation: Genetic Considerations in Sowing, Growing and Deploying Blister Rust Resistant SeedlingsMary Frances Mahalovich, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, ID
  • 11:25Challenges and Opportunities for Maintaining Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Southwestern U.S.Tom Kolb, University of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ
  • 12:00   Lunch (included with registration)
  • 1:00   Field Tour – Coeur d’Alene Nursery (transportation provided)
    The USDA Forest Service’s Coeur d’Alene Nursery was established in 1960 on 222 acres. The nursery’s mission is to provide quality seedlings for publicly owned lands and to develop the best possible methods for producing quality seedlings. To fulfill this mission, the nursery maintains 130 acres of seedbeds and 17 greenhouses. The nursery also cleans, tests, and stores seed, and provides seedling quality testing. The nursery’s 28 permanent employees have a combined 500 years of nursery experience.
  • 5:30   Evening Event (included with registration)

Friday, October 26

  • 8:30Woods Evaluation of Container Red Alder Grown with Bonzi® Plant Growth RegulatorNabil Khadduri, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Webster Nursery, Olympia, WA
  • 9:05Reforestation in Harsh Sites in MexicoArnulfo Aldrete, Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo, Mexico
  • 9:40Seedling Performance Metrics: A Standardized Monitoring ApproachAbbie Acuff, PotlatchDeltic, Lewiston, ID
  • 10:15   Break
  • 10:50What Do You Do After The End of the World? A Climate Adaptation Case Study from Northern New MexicoCollin Haffey, The Nature Conservancy, Santa Fe, NM
  • 11:25   Monitoring Plant Stress from Multiple Levels — Lloyd Nackley, Oregon State University, North Willamette Research and Extension Center, Aurora, OR
  • 12:00   Lunch (included with registration)
  • 1:00Stratification and Scarification Strategies for Whitebark Pine SeedEmily Rhoades, USDA Forest Service, Coeur d’Alene Nursery, ID
  • 1:35iFertigate and So Can You! Introducing a Mobile App for Calculating Fertigation FormulasDaniel Drummond, Southern Regional Extension Forestry, Athens, GA
  • 2:10Growing Container Seedlings in a Biochar-Amended SubstrateJeremy Pinto, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Moscow, ID
  • 2:45   Adjourn

What to do When You Meet Someone Suspicious in the Woods: Intervention and Contact Guidelines for Forestry Personnel

Workshop 1: What to do When You Meet Someone Suspicious in the Woods: Intervention and Contact Guidelines for Forestry Personnel

8:00 am to 12:00 pm, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

  • What are the basic factors for safe encounters in the woods? These actions will help keep you safe in uncertain situations: tactical plans, communication, proper tactics, physical condition and positive mental attitude.
  • What are the warning signs of a potential attack? Recognizing the signs of posture, verbal threats, disobeying instructions and positioning.
  • How should you respond to a potential attack? Avoid the mistakes of rushing when not required, relaxing too soon, not practicing, not utilizing cover and assuming a tough guy attitude.
  • What are the guidelines for maintaining your safety in attack situations? Follow the guidelines of not being afraid to be afraid, knowing your capabilities and knowing what the other person is capable of.
  • How do you assess a threat? What are the early signs of a potential attack? How can you analyze the threat? When to escalate your level of resistance. Avoiding over reaction and under reaction.
  • What to do if the situation arises to a physical confrontation and how to respond to danger.
  • Who do you call before, during and after? Maintaining communications with local law enforcement.
  • Dealing with dumping and squatting on your ownership.
Different workshop, same day, same location. Details below…

Workshop 2: Building Interpersonal and Group Communication Skills for Resolving Difficult Situations and Conflicts in Natural Resources

1:00 to 4 PM, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

Do you cringe at the idea of approaching a neighbor regarding shared expenses? Would you rather eat the costs instead of talking to a contractor about a service that did not meet expectations? Do you want to skip watershed or forest collaborative meetings when you know the topic will be heated? Why talk to people you disagree with in the first place?

As much as we would like to avoid uncomfortable conversations, it is often crucial for progress. Today more than ever it is important for us as foresters, members of organizations, or just citizens in our communities, to be able to engage in open and productive discussions over difficult or controversial issues. This class will help you develop practical skills, and give you some tools and processes that will help you and any organizations you participate in to work through difficult scenarios. Bring your real-life challenges, we will work on them!

Topics Covered will Include:

  1. Reframing Conflict as an Opportunity
  2. Understanding Conflict Styles
  3. Active Listening Principles and Skills
  4. Conflict in Group Settings
  5. Collaborative Leadership Skills
  6. Setting Meetings up for Success

Building Interpersonal and Group Communication Skills for Resolving Difficult Situations and Conflicts in Natural Resources

Workshop 2: Building Interpersonal and Group Communication Skills for Resolving Difficult Situations and Conflicts in Natural Resources

1:00 to 4 PM, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

Do you cringe at the idea of approaching a neighbor regarding shared expenses? Would you rather eat the costs instead of talking to a contractor about a service that did not meet expectations? Do you want to skip watershed or forest collaborative meetings when you know the topic will be heated? Why talk to people you disagree with in the first place?

As much as we would like to avoid uncomfortable conversations, it is often crucial for progress. Today more than ever it is important for us as foresters, members of organizations, or just citizens in our communities, to be able to engage in open and productive discussions over difficult or controversial issues. This class will help you develop practical skills, and give you some tools and processes that will help you and any organizations you participate in to work through difficult scenarios. Bring your real-life challenges, we will work on them!

Topics Covered will Include:

  1. Reframing Conflict as an Opportunity
  2. Understanding Conflict Styles
  3. Active Listening Principles and Skills
  4. Conflict in Group Settings
  5. Collaborative Leadership Skills
  6. Setting Meetings up for Success
Different workshop, same day, same location. Details below…

Workshop 1: What to do When You Meet Someone Suspicious in the Woods: Intervention and Contact Guidelines for Forestry Personnel

8:00 am to 12:00 pm, November 7, 2018
Holiday Inn, Springfield, OR

  • What are the basic factors for safe encounters in the woods? These actions will help keep you safe in uncertain situations: tactical plans, communication, proper tactics, physical condition and positive mental attitude.
  • What are the warning signs of a potential attack? Recognizing the signs of posture, verbal threats, disobeying instructions and positioning.
  • How should you respond to a potential attack? Avoid the mistakes of rushing when not required, relaxing too soon, not practicing, not utilizing cover and assuming a tough guy attitude.
  • What are the guidelines for maintaining your safety in attack situations? Follow the guidelines of not being afraid to be afraid, knowing your capabilities and knowing what the other person is capable of.
  • How do you assess a threat? What are the early signs of a potential attack? How can you analyze the threat? When to escalate your level of resistance. Avoiding over reaction and under reaction.
  • What to do if the situation arises to a physical confrontation and how to respond to danger.
  • Who do you call before, during and after? Maintaining communications with local law enforcement.
  • Dealing with dumping and squatting on your ownership.

Forest Road Surfacing: Basic Design Principles and Applied Practices

Thursday, November 8:

8:30  Introduction, Expectations, and Workshop Overview

9:00Common Road Surfacing Issues

  • The What, Where, and When Factors: Geology, Soils, Aggregate, Road Prism and Maintenance.
  • How They Make a Difference in Costs, Water Quality and Safety?

10:00  Break

10:30Soils Engineering – Relating Basic Properties to Road Surface Design
Subgrade

  • Soil Classification
  • Soil Moisture Content and Density

Noon  Lunch (included with registration)

1:00Soils Engineering – Relating Mechanical Properties to Road Surface Design

  • Potential Soil Strength vs. Actual Soil Strength
  • Geosynthetics
  • Subgrade Stabilization

2:30  Break

3:00How to Access Local Rock Sources

  • Geology Considerations
  • Rock Source Suitability
  • Rock Classification Methods
  • Aggregate Production and Development

5:00 Adjourn

Friday, November 9:

8:00Does the Rock Meet My Needs?

  • Gradation
  • Durability
  • Dust Abatement
  • Recycling Aggregate
  • Use of RAP

9:30   Break

10:00Commonly Used Aggregate Design Methods

  • AASHTO 1993 – Rut Equation
  • USDA Forest Service – STP
  • OR Dept. of Forestry Surfacing Guidance
  • Using What Has Worked in the Past

Noon   Lunch (included with registration)

1:00Surfacing Design Example Problems

  • Year-round Haul
  • Seasonal Haul
  • Restricted Haul

2:30   Break

3:00Road Surfacing BMPs and Sediment Reduction

  • Mechanics of Sediment Production from Forest Roads
  • Mitigating Surfacing Erosion
  • BMPs

4:00  Summary and Q&A

4:30  Adjourn

2018 PNW Forest Vegetation Management Conference: Vegetation Management in the Wildland Urban Interface


Click on the green presentation titles below to view a PDF of the presentation.

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Setting Stands up for Success – From Seed to PCT: Applied Early Stand Silviculture in the Inland Northwest

8:00Introduction and WelcomeMark Kimsey, Intermountain Forestry Cooperative, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

8:05Starting With the Best Seed: Genetic Testing and Seed Production To Improve Dry Side Disease Resistance and ValueJeff DeBell, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

8:30What’s New in Nursery Technology, Seedling Production, Seedling Failure, and Quality Assurance and ControlDiane Haase, Reforestation, Nurseries and Genetics Resources, USDA Forest Service, Portland, OR

8:55Developing Successful Operational Chemical Site Preparation PrescriptionsBill Pittman, Stimson Lumber Company, Coeur d’Alene, ID

9:20   Break

9:50The Importance of Seedling Quality for Successful Reforestation in the Inland NorthwestAndrew Nelson, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

10:20The Balance of Canopy Opening and Site Preparation to Successfully Regenerate Moist Mixed Conifer ForestsTerrie Jain, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Moscow, ID

10:45Panel: What Works and What Doesn’t at the Operational Level

  • Adam Robertson, PotlatchDeltic Corporation
  • Julie Donohoe, Idaho Dept. of Lands
  • Patrick Marolla, Hancock Forest Management
  • Scott McLeod, Washington Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA

11:45   Lunch

1:00Site-species Effects on Maximum Stand Density IndexMark Kimsey, Intermountain Forestry Cooperative, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

1:30Economics of Pre-commercial ThinningGreg Latta, College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

2:00   Break

2:15Why and How we Conduct Early Stand Silviculture

3:00 – 3:30   Meeting wrap up – group discussion

2019 Western Region COFE Seminar – Improving Forest Harvesting Operations

THEME: IMPROVING FOREST HARVESTING OPERATIONS

7:00 AM   REGISTRATION & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (Provided)

8:15   Introduction to WR.COFE & SeminarJeff Wimer, Chair, WR.COFE & Forest Engineering, Resources and Management Dept., College of Forestry, Oregon State University

SESSION 1: Logging – Steep Slope

8:30   Tethered Cut-to-length in Western Oregon: A Multi-objective Case StudyPreston Green, Graduate Student, Forest Engineering, Resources and Management Dept., College of Forestry, Oregon State University

9:00   Tethered logging in Southwest Oregon: A Research PerspectiveWoody Chung, Forest Engineering, Resources and Management Dept., College of Forestry, Oregon State University

9:30   Tethered Logging in Southwest Oregon: A Landowner PerspectiveBrennan Garrelts, Lone Rock

10:00   Peterson Cat update

10:10   BREAK (Refreshments Provided)

10:40   Pape’ Machinery Update

10:50   Grapple Yarding Through the YearsAustin Weber, Weber Logging and Construction Inc.

SESSION 2: Workforce Issues

11:20 Planning the 2020 Workforce: Growing Our Forest Contract CapacityRex Storm, Associated Oregon Loggers

11:50   Triad Machinery Update

12:00   LUNCH (Provided)

12:40   ANNOUNCEMENTS: Ticket Raffle, OSU Student Scholarship Awards – Jerry Sedlak Memorial Scholarship

13:10   Blount International Update

SESSION 3: New Technology

13:20   What Kind of Investment is Needed to Produce More Fire-Resistant Forests and Potentially, Reduced Wildfire Suppression Expenditure?Jeremy Fried, USDA Forest Service

13:50   Modern Machinery Update

14:00   BREAK (Refreshments Provided)

14:20   Fire Fighting on Federal LandMike Robinson, Coos Forest Protective Association

SESSION 4: Technological Innovation in Forestry

14:50   Computer Vision for Real-Time Tree Detection and MeasurementWoody Chung

SESSION 5: Roads

15:20   Rock EconomicsScott Hoffine, Roseburg

15:50   Road Construction in Forest Activities: The Safety Issues Related to Road ConstructionLarry Fipps, Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration

16:20   Wrap-Up and EvaluationJeff Wimer

Mapping the Course: Timberland, Forest Products Processing, and Fiber Issues for 2019

January 24, 2019


8:302019 Stressors and Opportunities for North American Forest Industry

Kevin Mason
ERA

Kevin Mason is the Managing Director of ERA Forest Products Research, which provides economic and investment research on the forest-product industry to over 150 clients in Canada, United States, Europe and Asia. The firm’s clients are primarily institutional money managers, but also include leading forest-products companies and governments.

Starting his career in finance, Mr. Mason progressed through various banking and consulting positions, providing services to Canadian and U.S. companies involved in a variety of industries ranging from biotech to retail. In 1997, he joined ERA Forest Products Research and proceeded to attain the Chartered Financial Analyst designation. His focus at ERA has been to enhance and expand the company’s analysis of global industry dynamics and to provide investment coverage on various Canadian, U.S. and European companies.

9:00Outlook for Sawlog and Pulpwood Prices in Western US and Western Canada

Håkan Ekström
Wood Resources International

Håkan Ekström, a native Swede, is the principal of Wood Resources International LLC (WRI), an internationally recognized consulting firm providing forest market analysis and wood price reporting for the forest industry worldwide since 1987. WRI publishes two quarterly market reports North American Wood Fiber Review and Wood Resource Quarterly.

He has worked in various capacities relating to wood products utilization, international forest products marketing, global wood supply/demand and price forecasting for the past 30 years. His international experience is extensive, including visitation of more than 25 countries to study forest products industry and forest resource developments on-site.

9:30Comparing the Competitiveness of North America’s Softwood Log and Lumber OperationsBrooks Mendell, FORISK

10:00Break

10:30Strategic Issues for US PNW Timberlands in 2019

Court Stanley
Port Blakely

Court Stanley currently serves as the President of Port Blakely Companies Forestry Divisions. In his role he oversees the working forests in Washington, Oregon (US Forestry) and New Zealand (NZ Forestry). Court was promoted into the role of President in August 2006. Prior to that, Mr. Stanley served in multiple leadership roles within Port Blakely including Chief Forester, Senior Vice President, and Vice President of Port Blakely Tree Farms LP. Court has over thirty years of experience in the forestry industry. He brings significant expertise and leadership to the executive team at Port Blakely.

Prior to joining Port Blakely, he was a forest engineer for Goldbelt, a Native American corporation in Southeast Alaska. Court grew up in Bellevue, Washington. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Forest Engineering from the University of Washington. He is also a graduate of the Washington Agriculture and Forestry Education Leadership Program (Class 21).

11:00US PNW Sawmill SectorAshlee Cribb, Structural Products, Roseburg

11:30US PNW Pulp Mill Sector

Larry Davis
Cosmo Specialty Fibers

With over 38 years of diverse experience in forest industry, Larry Davis is currently Director, Fiber Resources at Cosmo Specialty Fibers in Cosmopolis, Washington. Previously, Larry held leadership positons at Rayonier, International Paper, and Champion International. His roles included Region General Manager, Land Marketing and Sales, Business Development, Region Land Manager, Technical Services, and Strategic Planning. Larry has also served as Division Forester for Forest Resources Association and has worked on forest-related projects across the U.S., as well as internationally. Larry holds an MS in Forest Economics from Mississippi State University and a BS in Forestry from Louisiana Tech University.

11:45Lunch

1:00BC Interior Log and Lumber Issues Walter Matosevic, Residual Fiber, Canfor Pulp

1:30BC Coastal Log Supply Issues – Speaker TBA

2:00Japanese Market for Pellets

John Stirling
Pacific Bioenergy

John Stirling has been an integral part of developing the biomass industry in both Canada and USA since 2006 and recently joined Pacific BioEnergy Corporation as President in September 2018. John is responsible for the company’s global strategy, including developing the company’s growth and productivity initiatives, maintaining and forming new business and industrial partnerships, overseeing domestic and international affairs, and providing local functional support.

With an MBA – Operations & Finance, BS Mechanical Engineering and BA in Economics, John has held both President and CFO roles at various wood pellet manufacturing plants within Canada and the USA, following an executive level career in the areas of corporate finance, business development, marketing and project management.

2:30Break

3:00Public Lands Log Supply Contribution in Age of High Log and Housing Demand

Travis Joseph
American Forest Resource Council

Travis Joseph was born and raised in Springfield, Oregon but spent eight years in Washington D.C. working for the U.S. House of Representatives. He was a senior legislative aide to an Oregon congressman, a senior policy advisor on the House Natural Resources Committee, and the Director of Northwest Policy for the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Travis returned to Oregon to pursue his passion for healthy public forestlands and creating economic opportunities in rural communities. As President and CEO, Travis manages the budget, staff, communications, government relations, and overall strategy of the Association.

Travis earned his bachelor degree in history and international studies from the University of Oregon and a master’s degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science in environment and development.

3:30Changes in Lumber Flow and the Impact on Log Trade

Bob Flynn
International Timber for RISI

Robert (Bob) Flynn is Director, International Timber for RISI, the leading information provider for the global forest products industry. Bob has 40 years’ experience in the forest industry, including 9 years as a forester for Champion International in Oregon. He has spent the past 30 years as a consultant to the international forest industry, with a focus on analysis of timber supply and demand trends outside of North America; international trade of logs, woodchips, biomass and other forest products; and advising clients on international timberland investment. He joined RISI in April 2006, and has published six reports on China’s timber supply and demand; two global comparisons of planted forest economics and investment attractiveness for tree farm development; two profiles of India’s forest products industry; an analysis of the impact of Russia’s log export tax on Asian log markets; annual reports on international trade in woodchips and biomass; two reports on South American plantation forestry and bioenergy markets; and has co-authored an analysis of Southeast Asia’s timber supply trends and expected impacts on global forest products markets. In addition to authoring multi-client studies, he has reviewed timberland investment projects in Latin America, Oceania and Russia for investors, and he maintains RISI’s database of global forest ownership that includes 1,350 companies in 82 countries. He holds a BA degree in geography from the University of Texas, a BS degree in forest management from Northern Arizona University and an MS in economics from the University of Oregon.

4:00Reception

Optional Workshop – Growth Rings: Professional Development and Communication Skills

Course offered by the Western Forestry & Conservation Association (WFCA) and the Forisk Continuing Education Program (FCEP)

9:00 AM

  • How to Deliver a Presentation in a Variety of Settings
    This session includes an overview of what forestry communicators have gotten right and wrong (“the good, the bad, the ugly”). Then we review how to deliver a talk (presentation) under a range of circumstances.
  • How to Answer Questions After a Presentation
    Encouraging and answering questions from the audience completes a presentation. This session includes a framework and approach for handling Q&A and includes a group activity to practice this key communication skill.
  • How to Make Comments in a Public Setting (and How to Make an Effective “Pitch”)
    This session provides a framework for organizing, supporting and delivering a key point in real time at a meeting or conference. We also discuss the components of delivering an effective pitch, of having a plan to maximize the success and receptiveness of what you might propose to executives or customers.

Noon Lunch (included with registration)

1:00 PM

  • How to Give (and Receive) Feedback
    In this session, we review the importance of clearly communicating and reinforcing expectations. Session includes examples from sports and forestry, and a hands-on small group activity, along with guidance for “both sides of the table.”
  • How to Take Notes at Work, Time Management and Setting Priorities
    Being effective is, in great part, a function of how we manage our time and focus our energy. This session is about time management, setting priorities and capturing information during meetings and conferences. The way we take notes and organize information either reinforces or confuses priorities and calendar management.
  • How to Stay Current and Informed Inside and Outside of the Forest Industry
    How do successful forest investors and managers stay current? This session reviews key forestry data sets along with recommendations and examples of what to read. The discussion reinforces the habit of reading to stay informed, current (and Interesting).

3:00 Adjourn

2018 Joint Southern and Northeastern Mensurationists and IUFRO 4.01 Conference

Sunday, October 28

2:00 p.m. IUFRO Division 4.01: Welcome and Introductions (Jay Sullivan, Temesgen Hailemarian)
Session 1
  Moderator: Peter Marshall

  • Ed Green: Model Choice and Posterior Predictive Distributions
  • Guillermo Trincado: Modeling the influence of cambial age, radial growth and climate on wood density in Pinus radiata D. Don grown in Chile
  • Matthew Russell: Evaluating Ponderosa Pine Growth and Yield Equations for Application in Minnesota
  • Clara Antón-Fernández: An R package for flexible cross-platform individual tree simulations: SITREE
  • Astor Torano Caicoya: Forest management optimization for the state of Bavaria (southern Germany) using the single tree-based growth simulator SILVA 3.0

3:30 p.m. BREAK
Session 2
  Moderator: Temesgen Hailemarian

  • Greg Reams: Integrating Science and Technology in Delivery of the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program
  • Sergio Orrego: Using Biophysical Variables and Stand Density to Estimate Growth and Yield of Pinus patula: a Case Study in Antioquia, Colombia
  • David Affleck: Efficient Tree Selection Designs for Biomass Equation Development and Estimation
  • Bogdan Strimbu: A Scalar Measure Tracing Tree Species Composition in Space or Time
  • Rong Fang: Branch Sampling of Tree Structural Models Fitted from Lidar Point Clouds, a Case Study of an Experimental Douglas-fir Forest
  • Laura Ramirez: Spatial Financial Analysis of Potential Forest Plantations in Antioquia, Colombia

6:00 p.m.   Reception (Inn at Virginia Tech)
 901 Prices Fork Rd, Blacksburg, VA 24061

Monday, October 29

8:00 a.m. SOMENS/NEMO: Welcome and Introductions (Ralph Amateis)

8:15 a.m. Keynote Speaker – Harold Burkhart, University Distinguished Professor, Virginia Tech
Forest Mensuration and Modeling: Past Successes, Current Challenges and Future Prospects: A Personal Perspective

8:45 a.m. Session 3
  Moderator: Dean Coble

  • Margarida Tomé: Science supporting cork oak stands management: a stakeholder´s driven development of forest management support tools
  • Chad Babcock: On Spatial Autocorrelation in Design-based and Model-assisted Estimation Using Systematic Samples and Remote Sensing in Forest Inventory
  • Diane Kiernan: Assessing Small-stem Density in Northern Hardwood Selection System Stands
  • Josh Bankston: Effect of Sample-plot Size and Diameter Moments/Percentiles Prediction Model on Stand Diameter Distribution Recovery Accuracy

9:45 a.m. BREAK
Session 4
  Moderator: Diane Kiernan

  • David MacFarlane: Exploring Branch, Stem and Tree Wood Density Relationships for Temperate Tree Species in the Eastern USA
  • Stephanie Patton: Postthinning Response of White Spruce Plantations Affected by Eastern Spruce Budworm in Minnesota
  • Quang Cao: Deriving a Tree Survival Model from an Existing Stand Survival Model
  • Jim Westfall: Double Sampling for Post-Stratification in Forest Inventory
  • Frank Roesch: Truth or Consequences: Evaluation of the Re-measurement Period Assumption
  • John Kershaw: Application of Mixture Distributions to Describing Biomass Distribution Using TLS Data
  • David Walker: Regional and National Scale Aboveground Biomass Estimators for Applications Involving Multiple Tree Species

Noon   LUNCH (provided)

1:15 p.m. Session 5
  Moderator: Margarida Tomé

  • Brian Clough: Estimating Precision of Uncruised Stands: Applications for Model-based Forest
  • Mingling Wang: Understanding Dominant Height Projection Accuracy of Anamorphic Models
  • Garrett Dettmann: Generalized Predictors of Foliage Biomass for Tree Species of the United States
  • Corey Green: Comparison of Two Projection Strategies in Simulated Loblolly Pine Stands Under Various Levels of Spatial Heterogeneity
  • Sheng-I Yang: Evaluation of Total Volume and Stand Tables Estimates with Alternate Measurement-Tree-Selection Methods in Point Samples
  • Poster Presentations
    • Corey Green: Improved Removal Estimates with Small Area Estimation Methods
    • Thomas Harris: Methods for Developing New Longleaf Pine Individual Tree Taper, Green Weight and Volume Equations
    • Priscila Dias: Interactive Growth and Yield Models: An Example with Longleaf Pine in R
    • Anil Koirala: Analysing the Influence of Plot Size on Site Index and Dominant Height Estimates
    • Mark Porter: Estimating Tree Height from Multiple Stem Diameters
    • Steve Knowe: Overview of the FMRC Forest Sampling Simulator
    • Åsa Ramberg: Production Potential of Loblolly and Slash Pine in the Southeastern USA and a Comparison to the Potential of Scots Pine in Sweden

3:00 p.m. BREAK
Session 6
  Moderator: Aaron Weiskittel

  • Yingbing Chen: Application of Big BAF Sampling for Estimating Carbon on Small Woodlots
  • Stephen Kinane: A Model to Estimate Leaf Area Index in Loblolly Pine Plantations
  • Rebecca Wylie: Estimating Stand Age From Airborne Laser Scanning Data to Improve Ecosite-based Models of Black Spruce Wood Quality in the Boreal Forest of Ontario
  • Karol Bronisz: Taper Equations for Scots Pine Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data for Poland
  • Mauricio Zapata: A New Taper Equation for Loblolly Pine Using Penalized Spline Regression
  • Dehai Zhao: More Discussion on the Compatibility and Additivity of Tree Taper, Volume and Biomass Equations
  • Micky Allen: Relationships Between Volume Growth and Stand Density – An Examination of Past Hypotheses in Two Conifer Species

5:30 p.m.  Conference Banquet and recognition of Harold Burkhart (included with full registration) – Inn at VT

Tuesday, October 30

8:00 a.m.  Session 7
  Moderator: Phil Radtke

  • James McCarter: Annualizing FIA – Combining FIA Plots, Satellite Imagery, FVS to Create Single Year Estimates of Forest Inventory
  • Ting-Ru Yang: Application of Terrestrial LiDAR for Estimating Diameter Distributions in Newfoundland
  • Cristian Montes: A Dynamic State-space Specific Gravity Model for Loblolly Pine Using Data Assimilation to Improve Wood Property Estimates with Explicit Uncertainty
  • Spencer Peay: A Maximum Entropy Approach to Defining Geographic Bounds on Growth and Yield Model Usage
  • Eddie Bevilacqua: Additive Aboveground Dry Biomass Equations for Naturally Regenerated Pinus Occidentalis Sw. Trees
  • Bharat Pokharel: Predictive Mapping of Stand Characteristics Using A Non-Parametric Approach

9:45 a.m.  BREAK
Session 8
  Moderator: Clara Antón-Fernández

  • Abishek Poudel: Growth Analysis of White Oak Plantations in Central Missouri, USA
  • John Brown: Power Estimation for Binary Response Variables in a Randomized Block Setting
  • Krishna Poudel: Does Calibration Using Upper Stem Diameter Measurement Improve Predictive Ability of a Segmented Polynomial Taper Equation in Presence of Measurement Error?
  • Hector Restrepo: Prediction of Timber Product Class Proportions for Loblolly Pine in the Southeastern U.S.
  • Chris Cieszewski: Update on InFORM and Other Developments in the Fiber Supply Assessment Program
  • Poster presentations

Noon  LUNCH (provided)

1:15 p.m.  Session 9
Moderator: Guillermo Trincado

  • Jim Smith: Forest Measurements: Outside the Lines
  • Jacob Putney: Assessing Shifts in Vertical Distribution of Stem Cross-Sectional Increment in Response to Nitrogen Fertilization of Douglas-fir using a Nonlinear Mixed-Effects Modeling Approach
  • Salvador Gezan: Incorporating Genetics Into a Slash Pine Growth and Yield Model
  • Yung-Han Hsu: 3P Sampling with a Ricoh 360 Camera
  • Mike Strub: Measures of Goodness of Fit for Mortality Models

2:30 p.m.   Awards, Business, Adjourn

Wednesday, October 31

Optional Field Tour – Reynolds Homestead and Forestry Research Center, Critz, Virginia. Cost is $25.00.