All posts by Melinda Olson

2017 Southern Mensurationists Conference

General Meeting Agenda (to be updated with more details later):

Sunday, October 22

Arrival
Opening reception – 6:00pm – midnight
Billiard Suite and Baby Grand Suite (Rooms 501 & 502)
Light snacks, beer, wine, water, soft drinks

Monday, October 23

7:00-8:00am Breakfast (provided)
8:00-8:15am Introductions and Welcome
8:15-9:45am Research presentations
9:45-10:15am Break – snacks and coffee/beverages (provided)
10:15-noon Research presentations
noon-1:15pm Lunch (provided)
1:15-2:45pm Research presentations
2:45-3:15pm Break – snacks and coffee/beverages (provided)
3:15-5:00pm Research presentations
6:00pm Dinner downtown (provided)

Tuesday, October 24

7:00-8:00am Breakfast (provided)
8:00-9:45am Research presentations
9:45-10:15am Break – snacks and coffee/beverages (provided)
10:15-noon Research presentations
noon-1:15pm Lunch (provided)
1:15-2:45pm Research presentations
2:45-3:15pm Break – snacks and coffee/beverages (provided)
3:15-4:30pm Research presentations
4:30-5:00pm Awards, Closing Remarks, Short Business Meeting

Wednesday, October 25

Field Trip
Depart 8:00am, Return to hotel by 4:00pm
Join us for a day in the field looking at current research plots in southern pine management.
Stops: Loblolly pine research trials.
Stops include visits to:

  • Culture-Density research trial with planting densities ranging from 300 – 1800 trees per acre.
  • Accelerated Pine Productivity research trial nearing rotation age with a 2×2 factorial with fertilization and competition control.
  • Mid-Rotation Treatment study looking at the impacts of thinning intensity combined with a 2×2 factorial with fertilization and competition control, along with an non-thinned counterpart as a thinning control.
  • Other stops as time permits.

Field Trip Cost: $30 per person, includes lunch

Reviewing a Timberland Appraisal for Accuracy and Credibility

Tuesday – April 18, 2017

1:00 Introduction: Course Overview and Objectives
• Welcome
• Facilities
• Introductions – speakers and attendees
• Course Outline
• Handouts/Background Reading

1:20 Overview of Forest Management Concepts & Terminology
• What are the major timber producing regions of the U.S.?
• What are the major timber types within each region?
• Site productivity: the potential of an area to grow trees
• Timber stands: the basic units of management
• Management strategies: even-aged and uneven-aged management
• When to harvest: rotation length & financial vs. biological maturity
• Logging methods for timber harvest: ground vs. cable and types of equipment
• Where do logs go? Timber products, relative values, and their end-use markets
• Land Expectation Value
• Stumpage value

2:00 Drivers of Timberland Value
• Biological factors
• Physical factors
• Location
• Access
• Management history
• Regulatory & environmental issues

3:00 Break

3:15 Key Concepts & Principals of Valuation
• Market and other types of value
• Elements of market value
• The concept of Highest & Best Use
• Contributory value
• Economic principles underlying valuation
• Appraisal standards

4:00 The Three Approaches to Value & Their Use in Timberland Appraisal
• Income Capitalization Approach
• Sales Comparison Approach
• Cost Approach

5:00 Adjourn day 1

Wednesday – April 19, 2017

8:00 Application of the Income Approach to Small Properties
• Conversion Return method for merchantable timber
• Valuation pre-merchantable timber
• Contributory value of land
• Sources of data

8:30 Income Approach Exercise
• Split into groups for exercise and compare group results.

9:30 Application of the Income Approach to Large Properties
• Modeling discounted cash flow for large properties
• Key factors affecting discounted cash flow valuations
• Projecting log prices
• Determining the market discount rate
• Determining the growth & yield of the forest
• Calculating production & management costs
• Reversion value

10:15 Break

10:45 Selection of Sales & Adjustments Under the Sales Comparison Approach
• Sources of sale data
• Selecting “comparable” sales
• Elements & units of comparison
• Sale adjustments and analysis
• An example analysis

Noon Lunch (included with registration)

1:00 Sales Comparison Approach Exercise
• Split into groups for exercise and compare group results.

2:15 Reconciling to a Final Value Opinion
• Strengths and weaknesses of each approach – discussion
• Final reconciliation of the group exercise results

2:45 Break

3:00 Effective Appraisal Review & Interaction with the Appraiser
• How to select the right appraiser
• Providing the right data to the appraiser
• Appraisal review checklist

4:00 Wrap up, questions and answers

4:30 Adjourn

2017 Inland Empire Reforestation Council: Reforestation After the Burn

March 7, 2017, Mirabeau Park Convention Center, Spokane Valley, WA
(Note: new location for 2017 meeting)

8:00     Welcome and OpeningNorris Boothe, 2017 Chair, IERC, Forester, Coeur d’Alene Tribe

8:15    How did fires in 2014 & 2015 influence planting programs for 2016, 2017 and beyond? Phil Anderson, CF; Intensive Management Forester, Northeast Region, Washington State Department of Natural Resources

8:45     After the fire: where, when and what do we plant? Panel: Phil Anderson and Jeremy Hunt, Forester, Colville Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs

10:00   Break

10:30   What role does changing climate play in reforestation decisions?Marcus Warwell, Geneticist, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service

11:15   Species and stock type selection, what works best? Jeremy Pinto, Research Plant Physiologist/Tribal Nursery Specialist

12:00   Lunch

12:45   IERC Business Meeting 

 1:00    Reforestation following wildfire and salvage: Effects of herbicides, season of planting and delay since burn on survival and growth of planted conifer seedlings in Central Washington Scott McLeod, Silviculturist, Washington State Department of Natural Resources

2:00    Who is going to do the planting?  Forecast of contract labor issues – Wade Zaharie, Managing Member, Alpha Services, LLC.

 2:30    Break

3:00    So, we have planted; now what?  Patrick Marolla, Silviculture Manager, Hancock Forest Management, NE Oregon Tree Farm

4:15     Vendor recognition and closing

4:30     Adjourn and Social

Using your Smartphone/Tablet for High-Precision GPS Data Collection in Forestry and Natural Resources

Start Date: May 15, 2017 or May 18, 2017

8:30  Introduction and Overview

8:45  BYOD – The Future of Field Data Collection

  • What is BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)?
  • Why BYOD makes sense.
  • When BYOD doesn’t make sense.

9:30  GPS/GNSS receivers: Basic operation and technology trends

  • How does GPS work?
  • How accurate is GPS?
  • Different categories and capabilities of GPS receivers. Recreational vs. Professional
  • GPS Advancements: What can you expect in the next couple of years

10:30 Break

10:45 A look at BYOD hardware and software:

  • iOS, Android, Windows smartphones, and tablets.
  • Screen readability, GPS accuracy, ruggedness, expandability, and flexibility.
  • Open source (free) vs. paid. Esri, tMap, Avenza, GIS Cloud, etc.
  • Cloud vs. on-device software. To download or not to download?
  • What combination works best for you?

12:00 Lunch

1:00   GPS mapping fundamentals and troubleshooting

  • Why doesn’t my data line up?
  • Map projections and datums.
  • GIS data collection structure. Points, lines and polygons.
  • Field data collection forms.
  • Linking photos to data.

2:30   Break

2:45   Using background map data. Sources and cost.

  • Imagery (aerial/satellite/UAV photos).
  • Vector (roads, parcels, contours, etc.).
  • Sources of free and paid data.

3:15   Wrap up and Q&A

4:00   Adjourn

Do-It-Yourself Accurate Drone Mapping in Natural Resources

Start Date: May 16, 2017 or May 19, 2017

8:30  Introduction and Overview

8:45  Drone Rules

  • How to obtain a drone pilot certificate.
  • 20 hours of on-line study. Common test questions. Local test centers.
  • Drone flying rules. Where can you fly and not fly?
  • Flying by yourself, flying in the woods and around people.
  • Hobby vs. business flying.
    • The intent, not the drone, is the differentiator.

10:30 Break

11:00 Drone Technology: Capabilities, cost and pros/cons

  • Airframes
    • Rotorcraft, fixed-wing, hybrid.
    • Flight controller (tablet/smartphone vs. proprietary).
    • Airframe pros/cons.
    • Batteries.
    • Operating differences.

12:00 Lunch

1:00   Drone Technology (continued)

  • Mission planning software
    • Third-party vs. manufacturer-supplied.
    • iOS vs. Android vs. Windows.
  • Sensors
    • RGB cameras (photogrammetry, Phodar point clouds).
    • Lidar, thermal, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index).
  • Image processing software
    • Matching images effectively and accurately.
    • Using ground control points.
    • Cloud processing vs. Stand-alone processing.
    • Producing orthophotos, DEM (Digital Elevation Model)/DSM (Digital Surface Model), contours, volumes and 3D models.
    • Integrating into GIS (ESRI) systems.

2:30   Break

2:45   The Possibilities. What’s Possible with a $1,500 UAV?

  • Orthophoto example.
  • Elevation contour example.
  • 3D model example.
  • DEM/DSM example.
  • Volume example.

3:30   Wrap up and Q&A

4:00   Adjourn

2017 Western Region COFE Seminar – Improving Forest Harvest Operations

 

0815 – 0830 Introduction to WR.COFE & Seminar
Jeff Wimer, Chair, WR.COFE & OSU FERM Department

SESSION 1: Steep Slope Tethered Assist

0830-0900 Operators in Steep Slope Logging and Safety Measurement
John Garland – Garland and Associates

0900 – 0930 The Rapid Evolution of Steep Slope Winch Assist In the Woods of the Northwest
Bruce Skurdahl – Summit Machinery

0930 – 1000 International research on winch-assist equipment
Dzhamal Amishev – FPInnovations

1000 – 1010 Blount / Oregon Cutting Systems Update

1010 – 1040 BREAK (Refreshments Provided)

1040 – 1050 Peterson Cat

1050 – 1120 Proposed changes for streamside shade buffers with Salmon, Steelhead or Bull Trout streams
Greg Wagenblast – ODF

SESSION 2: Forest Practices Update

1120 – 1150 Potential Changes to Industrial Fire Rules
Chet Behling – ODF

1150 – 1200 Triad Machinery / Link-Belt update

1200 – 1240 LUNCH (Provided)

1240 – 1310 ANNOUNCEMENTS, Ticket Raffle, OSU Student Scholarship Awards –
Jerry Sedlak Memorial Scholarship

1310 – 1320 Pape’ Machinery update

SESSION 3: Technological Innovation in Forestry

1320 – 1350 Estimation of volume and products that can be obtained from individual stems using consumer grade cameras
Bogdan Strimbu – OSU College of Forestry

SESSION 4: Road and Water

1350 – 1420 Driving Technologies – Improving operational efficiencies while on the road
Soona Lee and Jeffrey Bowden – EROAD

1420 – 1430 Ponsse Update

1430 – 1500 BREAK (Refreshments Provided)

1500 – 1530 Slope and Abutment Construction using Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil
Michael Frey – Alliance Geosynthetics.

1530 – 1600 Scour and Redeposition in Streambed Simulated Culverts
Anna Vesper – Weyerhaeuser/OSU

1600 – 1630 Forest Bridges and other Structures
Alex Dunn – McGee Engineering

1630 – 1645 Wrap-Up and Evaluation — Jeff Wimer

Mapping the Course: Timberlands, Forest Products Processing, and Fiber Issues for 2017

Conference Materials for Attendees (password protected)

7:00     Networking buffet style breakfast

8:30     Welcome

8:35     Wood Raw-Material Price Trends in North America and Beyond – Hakan Ekstrom and Tim Gammell, Wood Resources International

9:00     Wood Fiber Supply Chain Outlook for 2017 Charles Spiggle, Wells Fargo Securities

9:40     2017 Strategic Issues for US Pacific Northwest TimberlandsJohn Davis, Green Diamond California Timberlands

10:15   Break

10:45   The British Columbia Wood Supply Base – Albert Nussbaum, BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

11:15   BC’s Interior Sawmill Sector: Changing Market Opportunities for Lumber and Residuals Walter Matosevic, Canfor Pulp Ltd

11:45   Lunch

1:00     The Game of Thrones: New Ownership and Opportunities in the PNW Pulp Sector  – Pete Foley, Nippon Dynawave Packaging Co

1:25     The PNW Plywood/ Veneer Sector: 2017 Opportunities and ThreatsTyler Freres, Freres Group

1:50     The PNW Lumber Sector: Balancing 2017 Log Costs, Facility Investments, Demand and Lumber Prices – Todd Payne, Seneca Sawmill Co.

2:20     Break

2:45     North American Log Export Markets in Asia – Tom Leeds, PLS International

3:15     Profitability and Production Cost Trends for the Sawmilling Sector in North AmericaBryan Beck, The Beck Group

3:45     U.S. Forest Industry Supply Chain Capacity and Costs in Logging, Hauling and Forest Management Brooks Mendell, FORISK Consulting

4:15     Adjourn and reception.

Seventh Western Native Plant Conference

Tuesday, December 6 – Pre-conference field tour

Field tour weather could be cool and rainy; participants should bring sturdy, waterproof walking shoes and clothing suitable for cold, wet, or muddy conditions.

9:00 Load buses and depart from the Heathman Lodge

4:00 Arrive back at hotel

The field tour will consist of 3 to 4 stops in Clark County to view wetland mitigation sites. These sites include varying strategies to restore and rehabilitate wetland complexes including ditching, draining, log jams, and native plant revegetation. The tour may also include a visit to see restoration projects at a nearby wildlife refuge. Transportation and lunch are included.

Wednesday, December 7

8:30 REGISTRATION AND CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

9:00 Welcome and Introductions – Diane Haase, Western Nursery Specialist, USDA Forest Service, Portland, OR

9:10 The Art, Science, and Humility of RestorationLee Riley, USDA Forest Service Dorena Genetic Resources Center, Cottage Grove, OR and Lynda Moore, USDA Forest Service, Deschutes National Forest, Bend, OR

9:45 Novel Seed Treatments to Reduce the Risk of Post-fire Seeding FailureMatt Madsen, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

10:20 BREAK

10:50 The Go Native Project at Bandon High SchoolDarcy Grahek, Bandon, OR

11:25 Chemistry Experiential Learning through Native PlantsMark Wolfenden, College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho, McCall, ID

12:00 LUNCH

1:15 Need Habitat Restoration for Pollinators, Monarchs, and Sage-Grouse? Forbs are the Answer Kas Dumroese, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Moscow, ID

1:50 Revegetation with an Emphasis on Pollinator Conservation:  Resources for PractitionersLynda Moore, USDA Forest Service, Sandy, OR and Matt Horning, USDA Forest Service, Deschutes National Forest, Bend, OR

2:25 Using Native Plants to Create Pollinator Habitat: Lessons Learned and New PerspectivesTom Landis, Native Plant Nursery Consulting, Medford, OR

3:00 BREAK

3:30 Advances in Using Biochar as a Media AmendmentClarice Matt, Botanist, Plains, MT

4:05 Early Results from the Oxbow Center Native Plant Research ProgramAnthony Davis, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

4:40 ADJOURN

Thursday, December 8

8:00 CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

8:15 The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly… Novel IPM Strategies for Bugs in the NurseryMargaret Skinner, Entomology Research Laboratory, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT

8:50 Phytophthora Diseases in Native Plant Production – Why Should I Care and What Can I Do About It? Marianne Elliott, College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, Washington State University, Puyallup, WA and Jennifer Parke, Oregon State University, Dept. of Crop and Soil Science & Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, Corvallis, OR

9:25 The Ecology and Management of Plant Invasions: The Role of RestorationDean Pearson, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Missoula, MT

10:00 BREAK

10:30 Effects of Logging Debris and Herbicide Treatments on Plant Community Development after Forest Harvesting  – Cancelled

11:05 Roadside Management of Cheatgrass and Medusahead with Tygh Valley Milkvetch, a Rare PlantCarolyn Menke, Institute for Applied Ecology, Corvallis, OR

11:40 What’s Wrong with Worms?Clay Antieau, Seattle Public Utilities, Seattle, WA

12:15 LUNCH

1:30 A Site for Sori: Growing Locally Adapted Ferns from Spores for Restoration Haley Smith, USDA Forest Service Dorena Genetic Resources Center, Cottage Grove, OR

2:05 Keeping it Real: Strategies to maintain wildness in agriculturally increased native seedSierra Smith, Center for Natural Lands Management, Olympia, WA

2:40 A new mobile app for off-line use of provisional seed zones for native plants Andrew Bower, USDA Forest Service, Olympia, WA

(NOTE: Following this presentation, there will be a hands-on demo of this app for those who would like to stay and learn more about it.)

3:15 ADJOURN