All posts by Melinda Olson

Scaling for Non-Scalers: Understanding the Scaling Process, Log Rules, Sorts, Grades and Accountability

9:00     Scaling Bureaus: How they operate and their role in log markets – Tom St. Laurent

  • How bureaus fit into the log buying and selling process
  • Represent both the log buyers and sellers
  • Apply log scaling rules
  • Provide qualified scalers
  • Serve as independent third parties

9:30     What does a log scaler do? Mike Belfry

  • How scalers fit into the log transaction process (only measure volume, not value)
  • What is their relationship to log buyers and sellers
  • Different points in log transport where scaling can occur
  • What is log volume and how is it calculated?
  • What are the specific measurements and data collected on a typical log?
  • Log documentation
  • Understanding gross and net volume
  • Why did my load scale out at a lesser volume? Reasons for volume deductions

10:30     Break

11:00     Northwest Log Scaling Rules: Applying uniformity and standardization within the Doug-fir processing area – Tom St. Laurent

  • Function and role of the rules
  • What they cover
  • How they are maintained and revised

11:30     Special requests: Using procedures in addition to the NW Log Scaling Rules – Tom St. Laurent

  • Why special requests are made
  • Common examples
  • Documenting special requests

Noon     Lunch

1:00     Understanding log grades and sorts – Mike Belfry

  • What is the difference between grades and sorts?
  • Why do sorts vary from company to company?
  • What is the difference between a good #2 sawlog and a rough #2 sawlog
  • What is the pulp sort?
  • What is a cull?

2:00     Break

2:15     Log accountability: Tracking the log load from landing to mill – Mike Belfry

  • How is data collected? Load receipts, weight reports, sample scales, sample expansion, log tags, scale tickets and certificates
  • Understanding the paperwork: Examples will be provided of load receipts, scale tickets and certificates and each form will be reviewed in detail.
  • What are the standard procedures for documentation and changes?
  • How is the data stored, disseminated and then accessed by clients?

3:45     Catch-all short topics – Mike Belfry and Tom St. Laurent

  • Difference between westside and eastside scaling
  • Understanding cubic measurements
  • Deciphering overrun and underrun
  • Volume conversion factors
  • Using taper factors and actual taper
  • Scaler cost and value

4:15     Adjourn

2017 NW Seed Orchard Managers Annual Meeting

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

1:00 PM Welcome and introductions
1:30 Laminated Root Rot Resistance in Douglas-fir Progeny Sites – Ronald Rhatigan
2:15 Update on the Reproductive Phenology Project – Janet Prevey, USDA Forest Service
2:45 Break and load bus
3:00 Depart for tour
3:30 Tour Pacific Forest Seed processing and extraction facility in Eagle Point, OR
5:30 Return to Medford
6:00 – 8:00 Evening social at Porters restaurant: Dinner from selected menu

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

8:00 AM Introductions
8:15 Round Table/audience discussion – Efficiencies made to seed operations and other topics
10:00 Break
10:15 Using PICOL: Pesticide Information Center Online – Lenora Jones, WA State Pesticide Management Resource Service, WA State University
11:00 ODA Pesticide Regulations for Seed Orchards – Rose Kachadoorian, Oregon Dept. of Agriculture
12:00 Depart for field tour
12:30 Weyerhaeuser Orchard – Managing a dry-site seed orchard
2:00 Elite Pear Orchard – Management techniques comparison of a fruit orchard with tree seed orchards.
3:30 Return to Medford and adjourn

2017 Joint Annual Nursery Meeting: Southern, Northeastern, and Intertribal Nursery Council

Monday • July 31

6:00 – 8:00 pm Ice Breaker

Tuesday • Aug 1

6:30 am Breakfast Buffet
8:00 Welcome – Forrest Boe, Director, Minnesota Dept. Of Natural Resources (invited)
Forest Health Challenges for Forest Tree Nurseries
8:15 Forest Regeneration in Minnesota – Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources
8:45 Blatant and Latent: A Tale of Two Diseases and Their Management in Seedling Nurseries – Glen Stanocz, University of Wisconsin – Madison
9:30 Dominus® Soil Biofumigation as an Alternative to Methyl Bromide: Results From Two Trials – Nabil Khadduri, Webster Nursery, Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources
10:00 Break
Expanding Markets
10:30 Gary Michael, Minnesota Conservation Reserve program
11:00 Alternative Tree Species Following Black Ash Loss Associated With Emerald Ash Borer: Early Survival, Growth, and Implications for Seedling Demand – Rob Slesak, University of Minnesota
11:30 Visit vendors
12:00 Lunch – NE and Southern Forest Nursery Associations and Intertribal Nursery Council
The Urban Interface
1:00 Urban Uses of Trees – Gary Johnson, U of Minnesota
1:45 Gravel Beds – Mike Reichenbach, U of Minnesota Extension
2:15 Discussion
2:30 Break
Opportunities in Native Plants and Seeds
3:00 Seed Mixes Heads-Up – Vic Vankus, USFS National Seed Lab
3:30 Pollinator and Seed Research – Dan Carriveau, University of Minnesota
4:00 Business meetings
4:30 Adjourn and dinner on your own.

Wednesday • August 2: Field Trip

6:30 Breakfast buffet
7:45 Board buses for field trip
8:00 Travel to Red Lake Forest Development Center greenhouse
9:30 Tour Red Lake greenhouse
11:00 Drive to Badoura State Forest
12:30 Lunch at Badoura State Forest
1:30 Tour Badoura State Forest
3:30 Depart for Itasca St Park
6:00 Evening banquet and boat tour
9:00 Arrive at conference hotel

Thursday • August 3

6:30 am Breakfast Buffet
8:00 Housekeeping and introductions
Seed Zones
8:15 Minnesota Forest Tree Seed Zones in an Era of Climate Change – Julie Etterson, University of Minnesota – Duluth
8:45 Eastern Seed Zone Forum – Carrie Pike, USDA Forest Service
9:15 Evaluation of longleaf pine fertilization treatments in the nursery nine years after outplanting – Paul Jackson
9:45 Break
10:15 Effectiveness of Capsaisan in Nursery Studies – Joshua Sloan
10:45 Speaker TBA
Noon Conference adjourns
Intertribal Nursery Council closeout lunch

2017 Field Technology Conference: Data Collection in Forestry, Fisheries and Natural Resources

The Field Technology Conference is at the center of technologies that are developing and converging at a rapid pace. Satellite imagery is enjoying its most exciting time in the last 40 years. GPS, already a staple in our everyday lives, is poised to make a huge advancement in accuracy and availability. Mobile devices (PDAs, handhelds and mobile phones) are, arguably, advancing at a pace as fast as any technology has in history. Terrestrial LiDAR (3D scanning) is becoming more affordable now and allows users to collect a massive amount of data in a matter of a minutes.

 

Agenda

Conference Agenda

Location

The conference will be held at the Holiday Inn Portland Airport Hotel. The Holiday Inn is located at 8439 NE Columbia Blvd., 2 miles from the Portland International Airport and 10 miles east of downtown Portland. The hotel can be reached at 503-256-5000.

 

Lodging information

Reduced rate lodging is available at the Holiday Inn by calling 855-642-6271 and by mentioning Field Technology Conference. The rate for a single room or double room is $115 plus tax. After October 23, 2017 the reduced rate will be subject to availability.

Registration

The registration fee is $225 if received by October 30, 2017 or $295 if received after October 30. The registration fees include 2 lunches and refreshments. Checks should be made payable to Western Forestry and Conservation Association. Purchase orders, VISA/MasterCard, and American Express are accepted. Tax id # 930-331-712. No refunds for cancellations after October 30, but substitutions are always welcome. Registration is available on line at www.westernforestry.org

 

Registration Questions?

Call Melinda at 503-226-4562 or melinda@westernforestry.org
Western Forestry and Conservation Association
4033 SW Canyon Rd., Portland, OR 97221
503-226-4562 ● westernforestry.org

 

SAF CFE credits

Attendees will be eligible for CFE credits thru the Society of American Foresters.

 

Exhibitor and Sponsor Opportunities

A variety of sponsorship and exhibitor opportunities are available at this event. This technology-focused conference brings the forestry and aquatic monitoring communities together to share best practices, learn about the newest in field technologies, and share field-tested expertise in collecting and using data in the field. By combining these communities, we expect an audience of 150+ at the Holiday Inn Portland Airport in Portland, Oregon on November 7 – 8, 2017. Historically, this conference has attracted forestry and fisheries field managers from the public and private sectors, tribes, non-profits and municipalities.

Summary of Sponsor and Exhibitor Opportunities

Advanced Insect and Disease Field Session: Identification, Life Cycles, Control Measures and Silvicultural Regimes

Monday, June 19, 2017

11:00 Field Session orientation and registration – Hood River Inn parking lot, Hood River, OR
11:30 Group departs for the field from Hood River Inn. Transportation and lunch provided.
Lunch (included with registration)
Afternoon topics:
1. Steps of diagnosis
2. Ips beetles
3. Red turpentine beetles
4. Woodborers
5. SOD and other invasive pathogens
6. Aerial survey overview
5:00 Arrive back at Hood River Inn

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

7:30 Depart from Hood River Inn
Morning Topics:
1. Overview of root diseases
2. Armillaria root disease
3. Mountain Pine Beetle
4. Thinning to prevent mt. pine beetle
5. Western spruce budworm
6. Douglas-fir tussock moth
Lunch (included with registration)
Afternoon topics and activities:
7. Indian paint fungus
8. Annosus root disease
9. Fir engraver
10. Dwarf Mistletoes
11. Group Exercise- Eastside Prescription
5:30 Arrive back at Hood River Inn

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

8:00 Depart from Hood River Inn
Morning topics:
1. Pine needle diseases
2. White pine blister rust
3. Stem decays
Lunch (included with registration)
Afternoon topics and activities:
4. Laminated Root Rot
5. Schweinitzii root and butt rot
6. Douglas-fir beetle
7. Team Exercise- Westside Prescription
5:30 Arrive back at Hood River Inn

Thursday, June 22, 2017

7:30 Depart from Hood River Inn
Morning topics and activities:
1. Team Exercise – Pruning Western White Pine
2. Larch casebearer
3. Larch needle diseases
4. Balsam woolly adelgid
5. Tree survival after fire
Lunch (included with registration)
Afternoon topics and activities:
6. Class Exercise – Identify Me!
7. Western pine beetle
8. Dwarf mistletoe recap – ponderosa pine
9. Class Exercise – Rating Dwarf mistletoe
10. Team Exercise – Dry Ponderosa pine Prescription
11. Session wrap – up
5:00 Arrive back at Hood River Inn and session adjourns.

Access, Easements, Rights-of-Way and Timber Trespass: What Every Forest Manager Needs to Know

The same agenda will be covered at each location.
Pick the session that is most convenient for you.

Session 1: May 25, 2017 – Springfield, OR
Session 2: Sept. 20, 2017 – Olympia, WA

8:30 am

• Basics of Easement Law
• Duties and Liabilities Grantors and Grantees
• Crafting a Solid Easement Agreement; Pitfalls To Avoid
• Easements of a Different Feather: Licenses, Permits and Profits a Prendre

10:00 – 10:30 Break

• Prescriptive Easements: Avoiding Rights Arising in Others
• Easements By Necessity: Dealing with Landlocked Parcels
• Minerals Issues: Surface and Subsurface Rights
• Conservation Easements

Noon Lunch (included with registration)

1:00 pm

• Road Maintenance Cost Sharing
• Recreational Users and Trespassers: A Primer on Liability
• Timber Trespass Overview

2:30 – 2:45 Break

• Timber Trespass Damages and Insurance
• How to Avoid Timber Trespass
• Forest Dwellings: Permitting and Access

4:00 Adjourn

Reviewing a Timberland Appraisal for Accuracy and Credibility

Tuesday – April 18, 2017

1:00 Introduction: Course Overview and Objectives
• Welcome
• Facilities
• Introductions – speakers and attendees
• Course Outline
• Handouts/Background Reading

1:20 Overview of Forest Management Concepts & Terminology
• What are the major timber producing regions of the U.S.?
• What are the major timber types within each region?
• Site productivity: the potential of an area to grow trees
• Timber stands: the basic units of management
• Management strategies: even-aged and uneven-aged management
• When to harvest: rotation length & financial vs. biological maturity
• Logging methods for timber harvest: ground vs. cable and types of equipment
• Where do logs go? Timber products, relative values, and their end-use markets
• Land Expectation Value
• Stumpage value

2:00 Drivers of Timberland Value
• Biological factors
• Physical factors
• Location
• Access
• Management history
• Regulatory & environmental issues

3:00 Break

3:15 Key Concepts & Principals of Valuation
• Market and other types of value
• Elements of market value
• The concept of Highest & Best Use
• Contributory value
• Economic principles underlying valuation
• Appraisal standards

4:00 The Three Approaches to Value & Their Use in Timberland Appraisal
• Income Capitalization Approach
• Sales Comparison Approach
• Cost Approach

5:00 Adjourn day 1

Wednesday – April 19, 2017

8:00 Application of the Income Approach to Small Properties
• Conversion Return method for merchantable timber
• Valuation pre-merchantable timber
• Contributory value of land
• Sources of data

8:30 Income Approach Exercise
• Split into groups for exercise and compare group results.

9:30 Application of the Income Approach to Large Properties
• Modeling discounted cash flow for large properties
• Key factors affecting discounted cash flow valuations
• Projecting log prices
• Determining the market discount rate
• Determining the growth & yield of the forest
• Calculating production & management costs
• Reversion value

10:15 Break

10:45 Selection of Sales & Adjustments Under the Sales Comparison Approach
• Sources of sale data
• Selecting “comparable” sales
• Elements & units of comparison
• Sale adjustments and analysis
• An example analysis

Noon Lunch (included with registration)

1:00 Sales Comparison Approach Exercise
• Split into groups for exercise and compare group results.

2:15 Reconciling to a Final Value Opinion
• Strengths and weaknesses of each approach – discussion
• Final reconciliation of the group exercise results

2:45 Break

3:00 Effective Appraisal Review & Interaction with the Appraiser
• How to select the right appraiser
• Providing the right data to the appraiser
• Appraisal review checklist

4:00 Wrap up, questions and answers

4:30 Adjourn

2017 Inland Empire Reforestation Council: Reforestation After the Burn

March 7, 2017, Mirabeau Park Convention Center, Spokane Valley, WA
(Note: new location for 2017 meeting)

8:00     Welcome and OpeningNorris Boothe, 2017 Chair, IERC, Forester, Coeur d’Alene Tribe

8:15    How did fires in 2014 & 2015 influence planting programs for 2016, 2017 and beyond? Phil Anderson, CF; Intensive Management Forester, Northeast Region, Washington State Department of Natural Resources

8:45     After the fire: where, when and what do we plant? Panel: Phil Anderson and Jeremy Hunt, Forester, Colville Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs

10:00   Break

10:30   What role does changing climate play in reforestation decisions?Marcus Warwell, Geneticist, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service

11:15   Species and stock type selection, what works best? Jeremy Pinto, Research Plant Physiologist/Tribal Nursery Specialist

12:00   Lunch

12:45   IERC Business Meeting 

 1:00    Reforestation following wildfire and salvage: Effects of herbicides, season of planting and delay since burn on survival and growth of planted conifer seedlings in Central Washington Scott McLeod, Silviculturist, Washington State Department of Natural Resources

2:00    Who is going to do the planting?  Forecast of contract labor issues – Wade Zaharie, Managing Member, Alpha Services, LLC.

 2:30    Break

3:00    So, we have planted; now what?  Patrick Marolla, Silviculture Manager, Hancock Forest Management, NE Oregon Tree Farm

4:15     Vendor recognition and closing

4:30     Adjourn and Social